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Experts suggest that men have a biological clock that begins to tick at middle age.
Looking at males using a fertility clinic, researchers found that a man’s fertility would drop around 7% each year between this 41st and 45th year of age, reducing more rapidly as he began to get older. His sperm quality was also found to decline as he aged.
Scientists studied 570 patients entering a fertility clinic between March 2008 to April 2011. To control for the age of females, all couples who were using eggs provided by young …

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A new £200 test could prevent huge numbers of women experiencing unnecessary chemotherapy by predicting whether their specific breast cancer could return post surgery.
Developed in Britain, the test will make use of technology widely used throughout NHS labs already, testing the recurrence chance of oestrogen positive (ER+) type breast cancer.
Currently, women diagnosed with ER+ type breast cancer will undergo surgery to remove the tumour before being treated with a hormone therapy in an attempt to combat remaining residual cancer. Hormone therapy also reduces the risk of recurrence.
Having assessed the tumour, …

Featured, NHS Reform News »

money for compensation

A threefold increase in compensation means egg donors in the UK are one of the best off in Europe.
The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) currently compensate donors up to £250 to cover their loss of earnings plus an unlimited amount to further cover expenses such as transport to clinic.
Generally, the overall cost per donor averages at around £500. However, the agreement by HFEA today means that all donors will receive a total fee of £750 per donation to cover all expenses.
The reasons for this, put forward by the …

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The NHS ombudsman warns GP’s to improve communication between themselves and patients to avoid even more patient complaints.
Last year 17% of all complaints received by the ombudsman were regarding local doctors and over a fifth of those were complaints from patients who felt they had been unfairly removed from their doctor’s lists.
According to the British Medical Association (BMA), anti-social behaviour caused by one member of a family shouldn’t mean that other family members are struck off the list.
Ann Abraham, of the ombudsman states that although the NHS will not …

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medicine pills

In a blow for patients who are suffering from an advanced form of skin cancer, it has been announced that a new drug capable of treating it will not be made available on the NHS.
The drug is called ipilimumab and it has already been used in clinical trials. But it has a price tag of £80,000 for every patient treated with the drug. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (otherwise known as NICE) has issued guidance recommending that the NHS does not use the treatment. Furthermore the clinical …

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money for compensation

Scotland’s NHS is experiencing a critical cash shortage, but it’s still managing to pay over 3000 clinicians, managers and executives a salary of over £100,000.  Last November saw ministers vowing to make ‘robust’ alterations to these film star level salaries, but to date the number of people receiving them remains unchanged.
The £300 million annual wage bill would be enough to pay for over 13,000 nurses.  However, rather than do that, nearly 2,000 nurses have been slashed from the NHS payroll as a means to save money.
In comparison to other salaries, …

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obesity in the uk

New research on how much we should be eating suggests we’re not getting enough calories every day.
An advisory committee has concluded that the current guidelines on daily calorie intake, introduced 20 years ago, have been slightly under-estimated for both men and women.
The Committee on the Medical Aspects of Food Policy (COMA) suggested in 1991 that women should aim to consume 1,940 calories a day and men 2,550. However, this has now been increased to 2,179 for women and 2,605 for men.
Professor Alan Jackman. Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Committee on …

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A study in Sweden has suggested that the mammogram programme in the UK could be causing women to receive unnecessary treatments for cancers that would otherwise have regressed without problem.
The study by the Nordic Cochrane Collaboration looked at the amount of cancers diagnosed in two groups of women. Of the women, aged from 40-69, some were screened two yearly whilst the others were screened six yearly.
It was expected that the number of cancers found would be similar over the two groups, however the finding showed that over 30% more tumours …

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medical4

Sunbeds could be more deadly than previously feared according to new research.
Before now, UVA rays emitted by sunbeds were known to cause signs of ageing such as wrinkles, however, new evidence suggests that they are in fact a cause of cancer.
After looking into the effects of both ultraviolet rays A (UVA) and B (UVB), Anthony Young, researcher at King’s College London and an expert at looking into the effects of the sun on skin, explained that despite tanning salons claiming UVA rays to be safe, this information is ‘nonsense.’
The study …

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New research on 100,000 newborns found that pollution emitted by vehicles can cause harm to pregnant women and their unborn babies leading to low birth weights and premature births.
The results suggest that the air carried more pollutants in the winter as oppose to summer and that inner city areas were more likely to be affected than more suburban areas.
The study, published in the journal Environmental Health, used information derived from health officials regarding the health of moms and babies born within 5 miles of air quality monitoring stations in LA. …