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Articles in the NHS Research News Category

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A brand new institute – The Translational (early stage) Research Partnerships – has been created by the government to cut red tape and allow various different institutions to combine forces to discover ground-breaking new drug treatments.
The idea is to allow both public and private groups to work together, so speeding up the process from trials to full patient use.  The whole procedure will be overseen by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).
This new funding will mean that the NHS, life science companies and university clinical researchers will be able …

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nhs stethoscope

An NHS trust is advising doctors to refrain from making a referral for investigation for patients suspected of having cancer, unless they can attend their appointment within two weeks.
Government guidelines suggest that patients suspected of having a tumour should have a referral to see a specialist within two weeks and so the move by the Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust will ensure this target will be met.
However, it will also mean that patients could end up waiting longer than necessary to see a specialist.
Chief Executive of the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire …

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nhs pills

In a new trial, doctors will prescribe ecstasy to patients suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
The belief is that it could ease the emotional pain of those who have endured distressing episodes such as war or rape, and in turn encourage them to feel more comfortable with these past events.
In America, a small trial of patients given the active ingredient in ecstasy; methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), alongside their psychotherapy, showed a significant positive effect of the drug on their mental well-being 8 weeks later compared to those administered with a placebo …

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nhs pills

A regularly prescribed painkiller has been found to significantly raise the risk of strokes and heart attacks.
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) advises those taking diclofenac to continue taking the drug but visit their GP if they are concerned.
Not only was Diclofenac prescribed for conditions such as arthritis and back pain up to 6m times last year, it is readily available over the counter. Yet scientists have discovered the risk of serious cardiac illnesses could be increased by up to 40% compared to those who don’t take it …

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medical4

After 10 years of research, scientists have concluded that laughter is the best medicine.
A quarter of an hour of pure belly laughter releases endorphins that help to control the levels of pain we feel and leave us feeling euphoric
Researchers sat participants down to watch TV programmes. Some watched Mr bean and other watched factual shows. Following this, participants were subjected to mild pain such as extreme work-outs and ice cold sleeves. They found that those who had watched the comedy programmes previous to enduring pain had a tolerance level …

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money for compensation

The NHS is owed millions of pounds from overseas patients who leave the country before paying up for treatments.
It is suspected that thousands of people flock to Britain every year with the intention of receiving hundreds of pounds worth of NHS treatments, and then leaving without paying.
From 2009-2010 alone, the NHS saw a deficit of £7m, the sole cause being foreigners fleeing the country before paying. In a time when the NHS is already strapped for cash, £7m could have paid for over 300 nurses for a year.
Generally, someone who …

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nhs pills

Taking ibuprofen could triple your chances of developing cancer according to new research.
A new study suggests that popping non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s), including ibuprofen, for longer than a ten year period could increase your chances of developing renal cancer, the commonest form of kidney cancer.
Aspirin was the only medication, used long term to ease anti-inflammatory pain, that did not present an increased risk of cancer.
Researchers from Harvard Medical School and Brigham Women’s Hospital in the US studied more than 125,000 people over a 20 year period. Those who took NSAID’s …

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money for compensation

Gene researchers and analysers within the NHS currently find the speed of their work bogged down by the ability of the NHS IT system.  However, by embracing ‘Cloud’ technology, this looks like it might be set to become a thing of the past.
Because of the huge amount of data involved it can take up to three months to sequence and analyse an individual gene.  Therefore if diagnosis and treatment relies on knowing a patients genetic make-up, this also takes an extended period of time.
But it appears that Eagle Genomics, a …

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Researchers have manufactured a virus that can identify and attack cancer cells in what they claim is a medical innovation
Writing in the Nature journal, researchers suggest that in the 23 patients trialled the virus targeted only cancerous tumours, ignoring healthy tissues.
The virus, JX-594, has to be injected around the tumour to avoid the immune system. The 23 patients, who had cancers that further spread to other parts of the body, had the virus injected into their blood stream.
Of the 8 patients that had the largest dose, the virus had …

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obesity in the uk

The overstretched NHS has paid out over £25m to accommodate grossly obese patients over the past 5 years, new figures have revealed.
Furthermore, as 23 out of 138 trusts have been asked to disclose their expenditure on specialist equipment, it is expected the true figure may be even higher.
Equipment brought includes reinforced beds, strengthened operating tables, wider stretchers, larger commodes and even bigger fridges for hospital mortuaries that can withhold bodies of up to 50 stone.
Across the country, costs included over £42,000 on seven bigger birthing beds for overweight …